CSS Vs Tables – 9 Reasons Why CSS Tableless Designs Are Better

To start, let’s take a look at what CSS is and why it’s so important to modern web design. CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets and was introduced by the World Wide Web Consortium in late 1996 with the aim to separate web page content (written copy, images, multimedia, etc.) from presentation (fonts, colors, layout, page structure, etc.). Another chief goal of CSS is to improve and enhance web accessibility. Previous to the introduction of CSS, a web page’s HTML markup defined both content and presentation. https://www.csstimes.pk/
CSS is usually contained in a separate file from an HTML web page. This is why CSS files are frequently referred to as “external style sheets”. When an HTML page or other type of web page loads like .aspx, .php, or .cgi, the page calls the external CSS file and reads all of the presentation properties defined in the file. The CSS file tells the HTML page how to style the website’s content and in the case of tableless web design, where to place it. With CSS, a web designer can set rules for the presentation of individual web pages or an entire site.
Traditionally, web pages were built using HTML with tables to layout the page structure and content. These cell based tables are very similar in form to a table found in Microsoft Excel and Word. An advantage of using tables is when used properly, it closely mimics the standard page layout in print media such as newspapers or magazine articles. However, as web technology has advanced and become more dynamic, a new era of design with greater possibilities has emerged. A new approach to designing and laying out web pages was created to break the constraints of structured table layouts. This approach is called CSS tableless design.
It’s important to understand that traditional table based design and CSS are not mutually exclusive; CSS is frequently used by web developers using table based design to control the properties of tables and other items on their web pages. On the other hand, tableless design wouldn’t be possible without CSS. However, instead of using tables, a tableless designer uses what are known as “DIV”s, which is short for “division”. The name DIV is also derived from the HTML